In Cold Blood

Author: Truman Capote
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1588361659
Size: 12.19 MB
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National Bestseller On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues. As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy. In Cold Blood is a work that transcends its moment, yielding poignant insights into the nature of American violence.

In Cold Blood

Author: Truman Capote
Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.
ISBN: 9780812994384
Size: 12.82 MB
Format: PDF
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Powerful account of the brutal slaying of a Kansas family by two young ex-convicts.

Ideology In Cold Blood

Author: Shadi BARTSCH
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674020553
Size: 11.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Is Lucan's brilliant and grotesque epic Civil War an example of ideological poetry at its most flagrant, or is it a work that despairingly proclaims the meaninglessness of ideology? Shadi Bartsch offers a startlingly new answer to this split debate on the Roman poet's magnum opus. Reflecting on the disintegration of the Roman republic in the wake of the civil war that began in 49 B.C., Lucan (writing during the grim tyranny of Nero's Rome) recounts that fateful conflict with a strangely ambiguous portrayal of his republican hero, Pompey. Although the story is one of a tragic defeat, the language of his epic is more often violent and nihilistic than heroic and tragic. And Lucan is oddly fascinated by the graphic destruction of lives, the violation of human bodies--an interest paralleled in his deviant syntax and fragmented poetry. In an analysis that draws on contemporary political thought ranging from Hannah Arendt and Richard Rorty to the poetry of Vietnam veterans, as well as on literary theory and ancient sources, Bartsch finds in the paradoxes of Lucan's poetry both a political irony that responds to the universally perceived need for, yet suspicion of, ideology, and a recourse to the redemptive power of storytelling. This shrewd and lively book contributes substantially to our understanding of Roman civilization and of poetry as a means of political expression. Table of Contents: Preface Introduction The Subject under Siege Paradox, Doubling, and Despair Pompey as Pivot The Will to Believe History without Banisters Notes Bibliography Index Reviews of this book: The problem of Lucan's stance is notorious, and it is the focus of Bartsch's book...She makes her own gripping contribution to the dossier of Lucanian despair in her first two chapters; but she believes that ultimately such interpretations sell the poet short, as an artist and a person. Her Lucan, both inside and outside his poem, is a Sartrean existentialist or a Rortyan moral ironist, who accepts the evanescence of traditional moral and political verities but who behaves as if his ideology matters anyhow and makes his choice regardless. Hence the "ideology in cold blood" of her title: Lucan knows, and spellbindingly demonstrates, that Liberty is a cipher, but he commits himself to it none the less. Bartsch has put her finger on a key issue, and her passionate book is a useful check to the establishment of a new orthodoxy on Lucan. --Denis Feeney, Times Literary Supplement Reviews of this book: This could be that elusive creature, an Important Book. --Gideon Nisbet, Bryn Mawr Classical Review Reviews of this book: This is a stimulating work, which I find has provoked many questions about Lucan's poem, about liberal irony, and about history...The strengths of this book lie in its brevity, in its integration of detailed analyses with broader theoretical issues, and in its accessibility. It addresses a question which is of relevance to not only Lucanians, or Latinists, or classicists, but anyone who thinks about the politics of literature. --Ellen O'Gorman, Classical World Reviews of this book: Bartsch goes far beyond the boundaries of Lucan's Civil War itself. Readers interested in Latin literature in general, in the civil wars that ended the Republic, in the political context of the first centuries B.C.E. and C.E., in questions of human response to political repression long after Lucan, and those interested in Lucan himself as poet and conspirator, will want to read Ideology in Cold Blood. Bartsch has taken two prevailing camps of criticism--Lucan as "nihilist" and Lucan as "partisan"--and proposed an elegantly argued third alternative: Lucan as "political ironist." --Choice Reviews of this book: Ideology in Cold Blood provides a strikingly dissident approach to Lucan in that it aims to weld together a text-oriented focus, a political reading of the Civil War and a discussion of Lucan's political activities, i.e. his involvement in the Pisonian conspiracy. Bartsch's decision to include a biographical approach in her analysis should not be taken for bland naivety coming at a time when influential scholars on Lucan have come to reject this approach for the blatant fallacies that it entails. Bartsch offers something completely novel in this area, for it is entirely obvious that her sympathies do not lie with forms of historical reconstructionism in which the biographical data are simply made to correlate with the presumed political message of the poem...[Bartsch's book] will surely be ranked among the best works on the poet and I strongly recommend it to scholars interested in the literature of the Principate and in the role of Roman political epic. --Marc Kleijwegt, Scholia

Life In Cold Blood

Author: David Attenborough
Publisher: Ebury Press
ISBN: IND:30000110560129
Size: 12.30 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Reptiles and amphibians ruled the world for nearly 200 million years and today there are still over 12,500 of them. Some are huge, the deadliest creatures on earth. Some are tiny, among the strangest to be found anywhere. Together they not only outnumber mammals or birds but in their colourful variety and extraordinary behaviour, they far surpass them. So where did these ancient creatures come from? How have they transformed themselves into the bizarre and beautiful forms that are alive today? And what's the secret of their epic success? InLife in Cold Blood, David traces the story of their evolution and overturns the myth that these creatures are just primitive killers to reveal them for what they truly are.

Truman Capote S Nonfiction Novel In Cold Blood And Bennett Miller S Biopic Capote

Author: Michael Helten
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 9783640526154
Size: 18.86 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Examination Thesis from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1, University of Freiburg, language: English, abstract: When In Cold Blood was first published, critics had a hard time categorizing the book. Capote himself held that he had written a "nonfiction novel (Capote in Plimpton 1966: 2)" and that he had thereby created an altogether new genre. In the subtitle, Capote stresses his central claim regarding this new genre, assuring the reader that what she is about to delve into is "a true account of a multiple murder and its consequences (Capote 2000 [1966])." As will be seen in the opening chapter, criticism of In Cold Blood has therefore to a great degree revolved around Capote's and the book's adherence to this assertion of truth. The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles (SOED) lists as the three first entries under the head word "true" true /tru: / 1 Steadfast in allegiance, loyal; faithful, constant (...). 2 Honest, honourable, upright, virtuous; straightforward, sincere (...). 3 Of a statement, report, etc.: consistent with fact; conforming with reality (...). The following investigation of In Cold Blood and of the biopic based on Capote's work on the book, Bennett Miller's Capote (2005), will proceed along the lines of these three aspects of the definition, questioning Capote's claim of rendering a "true account." The genre chapter and large parts of the ensuing discussion of In Cold Blood will be especially concerned with the definition's third aspect, In Cold Blood's consistency with fact and its conformity with reality. The question will be raised as to whether or not a true account of real events is possible at all, and in what ways Capote and other writers of New Journalism, as the genre is most frequently called today, have tried to achieve such true accounts.